Lucinda Chambers

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

LUCINDA: My family are all fine very luckily and we have been living at home, West London — me, my husband and one of our sons who goes back and forth to university.

ALIX: Tell me how you start a typical day. What’s the first thing you do when you get up in the morning?

LUCINDA: The first thing I do is wake up and turn the radio on to the news; my husband has brought me a cup of tea in bed for the last thirty years, lemon and ginger. I know, it’s treaty.

ALIX: You are a long time veteran of the fashion world. Were there times in the past that you considered starting your own collection (as we used to call it before ‘brand’ became such a big thing)?

LUCINDA: No, I had never considered starting my own business. I was often asked if I would, but the time was never right. I was too busy doing other things, which I loved.

ALIX: Why Colville now? What was the impetus? (And out of curiosity, where did the name come from?)

LUCINDA: I think I joined up with Molly and Colville because I had space in my life to do it, timing felt right and I wouldn’t have done it with anyone else.  We had worked together for years, so we know exactly how the other works, our strengths and weaknesses and also, very importantly, how to have a laugh. Molly and Kris [Kristen Forss, a third founder, now Colville collaborator] thought of the name. Colville is where we hang out, it’s where Hockney used to live. We love that part of London and I go there every Friday to the market...it felt right and it looked great when we designed it.

ALIX: What are you trying to do differently with Colville?

LUCINDA: I think we are running a very different company than what we have seen before. For a start, we champion everyone who we work with — everyone. We name names, give them a shout and spread the word. In that respect it feels more like a community, a collective, of like-minded people bought together. We have a great sense of people’s worth. This includes all the social projects that Colville does, from Turkey to Dhakar, Mexico and Suffolk! We sit down for lunch, usually delicious pasta, talk and then have coffee. Nothing is rushed, we take pleasure in everything we do.

ALIX: What is the spirit/soul/mission of Colville?

LUCINDA: The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last.

ALIX: What about it keeps you and your team most inspired and excited most?

LUCINDA: I think we all love to collaborate! Even if it's suggested [to work] with someone who feels very random, it gets us excited. We always have great brainstorming sessions, lots of ideas fly around and it’s our happy place. It’s also about the people we collaborate with. We love them and they mean something to us at Colville. We don’t take anyone for granted and what they bring to us, whether it’s skill or ideas or craft, it’s very exciting. We went on a trip to Asia and I think we had a blast! It seems very far away now, to have pop ups, meet customers and buyers, we loved every minute of it, and as for the food…heaven!

ALIX: Where do values like sustainability and community come in? And how do they impact the way that you approach Colville from a purely aesthetic point of view? 

LUCINDA: Sustainability and upcycling have always been and will always be a huge part of who we are, what defines us.  We are always finding new ways of doing things, always asking the questions and always challenging old ways of doing things to put better ones in place. We are small but growing, and have a lot to learn along the way — which is great I think, to keep evolving.

ALIX: What have been some of the biggest highs in this Colville journey?

LUCINDA: I think the highs always involve people. During lockdown, Molly and I did an impulsive Calling All Knitters project to help a women’s charity in Milan. The response was incredible, so touching how many people started knitting.  We approached Sotheby’s to help with the auction and they were on board straight away with all their help and expertise. It’s times like that you think, wow, people are just the best. Lately we have heard a lot about the negative impact of fashion on the world. 

"The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last." - Lucinda

ALIX: Do you think that fashion can still be a positive force for change? And if so, how?

LUCINDA: Fashion can always be positive. You find the people, the good ones, and with the creativity and positivity there you can put in place incredible things. Like any industry, there will be the not-so-like minded. I can sense them. And luckily I can avoid them. But if the goodwill is there, there is so much to love about fashion.  It can lift the spirits, change the way you feel about yourself, keep billions of people in employment and be very spiritually uplifting and extremely joyous.

ALIX: As a former magazine person, I’m curious to know what current magazines inspire you. Who do you think is doing a good job these days? Or, what do you think fashion/style magazines could be doing better?

LUCINDA: I really like looking at the nicer end of magazines, ones like The Pleasure Gardens, More of Less, Rika. I always marvel at the ingenuity of them, the sheer hard work and love that is cured into them, those are the ones I keep, they are usually the most creative and pure and visually very exciting. I am also a huge fan of The World of Interiors and AD.

ALIX: And on a similar note, are there other fashion brands out there you admire?

LUCINDA: There are lots of fashion brands that I like to dip into... I love Faye Toogood, Studio Nicholson, Christopher Kane, Lemaire.  And I'm always curious about Prada having worked there for so long!

ALIX: What gives you cause for optimism?

LUCINDA: Pretty much everything… I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture.

ALIX: That’s a pretty good life.

"I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture." - Lucinda

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Lucinda Chambers

Brownstone Cowboys Magazine A Shirt Tale main image

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

No items found.

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Lucinda Chambers

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

LUCINDA: My family are all fine very luckily and we have been living at home, West London — me, my husband and one of our sons who goes back and forth to university.

ALIX: Tell me how you start a typical day. What’s the first thing you do when you get up in the morning?

LUCINDA: The first thing I do is wake up and turn the radio on to the news; my husband has brought me a cup of tea in bed for the last thirty years, lemon and ginger. I know, it’s treaty.

ALIX: You are a long time veteran of the fashion world. Were there times in the past that you considered starting your own collection (as we used to call it before ‘brand’ became such a big thing)?

LUCINDA: No, I had never considered starting my own business. I was often asked if I would, but the time was never right. I was too busy doing other things, which I loved.

ALIX: Why Colville now? What was the impetus? (And out of curiosity, where did the name come from?)

LUCINDA: I think I joined up with Molly and Colville because I had space in my life to do it, timing felt right and I wouldn’t have done it with anyone else.  We had worked together for years, so we know exactly how the other works, our strengths and weaknesses and also, very importantly, how to have a laugh. Molly and Kris [Kristen Forss, a third founder, now Colville collaborator] thought of the name. Colville is where we hang out, it’s where Hockney used to live. We love that part of London and I go there every Friday to the market...it felt right and it looked great when we designed it.

ALIX: What are you trying to do differently with Colville?

LUCINDA: I think we are running a very different company than what we have seen before. For a start, we champion everyone who we work with — everyone. We name names, give them a shout and spread the word. In that respect it feels more like a community, a collective, of like-minded people bought together. We have a great sense of people’s worth. This includes all the social projects that Colville does, from Turkey to Dhakar, Mexico and Suffolk! We sit down for lunch, usually delicious pasta, talk and then have coffee. Nothing is rushed, we take pleasure in everything we do.

ALIX: What is the spirit/soul/mission of Colville?

LUCINDA: The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last.

ALIX: What about it keeps you and your team most inspired and excited most?

LUCINDA: I think we all love to collaborate! Even if it's suggested [to work] with someone who feels very random, it gets us excited. We always have great brainstorming sessions, lots of ideas fly around and it’s our happy place. It’s also about the people we collaborate with. We love them and they mean something to us at Colville. We don’t take anyone for granted and what they bring to us, whether it’s skill or ideas or craft, it’s very exciting. We went on a trip to Asia and I think we had a blast! It seems very far away now, to have pop ups, meet customers and buyers, we loved every minute of it, and as for the food…heaven!

ALIX: Where do values like sustainability and community come in? And how do they impact the way that you approach Colville from a purely aesthetic point of view? 

LUCINDA: Sustainability and upcycling have always been and will always be a huge part of who we are, what defines us.  We are always finding new ways of doing things, always asking the questions and always challenging old ways of doing things to put better ones in place. We are small but growing, and have a lot to learn along the way — which is great I think, to keep evolving.

ALIX: What have been some of the biggest highs in this Colville journey?

LUCINDA: I think the highs always involve people. During lockdown, Molly and I did an impulsive Calling All Knitters project to help a women’s charity in Milan. The response was incredible, so touching how many people started knitting.  We approached Sotheby’s to help with the auction and they were on board straight away with all their help and expertise. It’s times like that you think, wow, people are just the best. Lately we have heard a lot about the negative impact of fashion on the world. 

ALIX: Do you think that fashion can still be a positive force for change? And if so, how?

LUCINDA: Fashion can always be positive. You find the people, the good ones, and with the creativity and positivity there you can put in place incredible things. Like any industry, there will be the not-so-like minded. I can sense them. And luckily I can avoid them. But if the goodwill is there, there is so much to love about fashion.  It can lift the spirits, change the way you feel about yourself, keep billions of people in employment and be very spiritually uplifting and extremely joyous.

ALIX: As a former magazine person, I’m curious to know what current magazines inspire you. Who do you think is doing a good job these days? Or, what do you think fashion/style magazines could be doing better?

LUCINDA: I really like looking at the nicer end of magazines, ones like The Pleasure Gardens, More of Less, Rika. I always marvel at the ingenuity of them, the sheer hard work and love that is cured into them, those are the ones I keep, they are usually the most creative and pure and visually very exciting. I am also a huge fan of The World of Interiors and AD.

ALIX: And on a similar note, are there other fashion brands out there you admire?

LUCINDA: There are lots of fashion brands that I like to dip into... I love Faye Toogood, Studio Nicholson, Christopher Kane, Lemaire.  And I'm always curious about Prada having worked there for so long!

ALIX: What gives you cause for optimism?

LUCINDA: Pretty much everything… I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture.

ALIX: That’s a pretty good life.

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Lucinda Chambers

HASSON

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

"The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last." - Lucinda

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

No items found.

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Lucinda Chambers

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

No items found.

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Pink

frost

Thistle

brown

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Super talented stylist-turned-photographer Thistle Browne and stylist Heathermary Jackson — both in New Zealand during COVID-19 lockdowns — traveled to Rangitoto Island, a dormant volcano off the coast of Central Auckland, to shoot the new campaign for New Zealand jewelry designer Jasmin Sparrow. The shoot showcases Sparrow’s timeless gold and silver jewelry, and a beautiful collection of hand-beaded bras and skull caps designed with Glen Prentice. Models wore mainly vintage from Search and Destroy and Brownstone Cowboys’ collection, combined with some local, sustainable brands and New Zealand gumboots (rainboots).
Photography: Thistle Brown
Styling: Heathermary Jackson
Designers: Jasmin Sparrow and Glen Prentice
Models: Charlotte Moffatt, Nina Katungi, Obadiah Russon

Lucinda Chambers

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

LUCINDA: My family are all fine very luckily and we have been living at home, West London — me, my husband and one of our sons who goes back and forth to university.

ALIX: Tell me how you start a typical day. What’s the first thing you do when you get up in the morning?

LUCINDA: The first thing I do is wake up and turn the radio on to the news; my husband has brought me a cup of tea in bed for the last thirty years, lemon and ginger. I know, it’s treaty.

ALIX: You are a long time veteran of the fashion world. Were there times in the past that you considered starting your own collection (as we used to call it before ‘brand’ became such a big thing)?

LUCINDA: No, I had never considered starting my own business. I was often asked if I would, but the time was never right. I was too busy doing other things, which I loved.

ALIX: Why Colville now? What was the impetus? (And out of curiosity, where did the name come from?)

LUCINDA: I think I joined up with Molly and Colville because I had space in my life to do it, timing felt right and I wouldn’t have done it with anyone else.  We had worked together for years, so we know exactly how the other works, our strengths and weaknesses and also, very importantly, how to have a laugh. Molly and Kris [Kristen Forss, a third founder, now Colville collaborator] thought of the name. Colville is where we hang out, it’s where Hockney used to live. We love that part of London and I go there every Friday to the market...it felt right and it looked great when we designed it.

ALIX: What are you trying to do differently with Colville?

LUCINDA: I think we are running a very different company than what we have seen before. For a start, we champion everyone who we work with — everyone. We name names, give them a shout and spread the word. In that respect it feels more like a community, a collective, of like-minded people bought together. We have a great sense of people’s worth. This includes all the social projects that Colville does, from Turkey to Dhakar, Mexico and Suffolk! We sit down for lunch, usually delicious pasta, talk and then have coffee. Nothing is rushed, we take pleasure in everything we do.

ALIX: What is the spirit/soul/mission of Colville?

LUCINDA: The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last.

ALIX: What about it keeps you and your team most inspired and excited most?

LUCINDA: I think we all love to collaborate! Even if it's suggested [to work] with someone who feels very random, it gets us excited. We always have great brainstorming sessions, lots of ideas fly around and it’s our happy place. It’s also about the people we collaborate with. We love them and they mean something to us at Colville. We don’t take anyone for granted and what they bring to us, whether it’s skill or ideas or craft, it’s very exciting. We went on a trip to Asia and I think we had a blast! It seems very far away now, to have pop ups, meet customers and buyers, we loved every minute of it, and as for the food…heaven!

ALIX: Where do values like sustainability and community come in? And how do they impact the way that you approach Colville from a purely aesthetic point of view? 

LUCINDA: Sustainability and upcycling have always been and will always be a huge part of who we are, what defines us.  We are always finding new ways of doing things, always asking the questions and always challenging old ways of doing things to put better ones in place. We are small but growing, and have a lot to learn along the way — which is great I think, to keep evolving.

ALIX: What have been some of the biggest highs in this Colville journey?

LUCINDA: I think the highs always involve people. During lockdown, Molly and I did an impulsive Calling All Knitters project to help a women’s charity in Milan. The response was incredible, so touching how many people started knitting.  We approached Sotheby’s to help with the auction and they were on board straight away with all their help and expertise. It’s times like that you think, wow, people are just the best. Lately we have heard a lot about the negative impact of fashion on the world. 

"The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last." - Lucinda

ALIX: Do you think that fashion can still be a positive force for change? And if so, how?

LUCINDA: Fashion can always be positive. You find the people, the good ones, and with the creativity and positivity there you can put in place incredible things. Like any industry, there will be the not-so-like minded. I can sense them. And luckily I can avoid them. But if the goodwill is there, there is so much to love about fashion.  It can lift the spirits, change the way you feel about yourself, keep billions of people in employment and be very spiritually uplifting and extremely joyous.

ALIX: As a former magazine person, I’m curious to know what current magazines inspire you. Who do you think is doing a good job these days? Or, what do you think fashion/style magazines could be doing better?

LUCINDA: I really like looking at the nicer end of magazines, ones like The Pleasure Gardens, More of Less, Rika. I always marvel at the ingenuity of them, the sheer hard work and love that is cured into them, those are the ones I keep, they are usually the most creative and pure and visually very exciting. I am also a huge fan of The World of Interiors and AD.

ALIX: And on a similar note, are there other fashion brands out there you admire?

LUCINDA: There are lots of fashion brands that I like to dip into... I love Faye Toogood, Studio Nicholson, Christopher Kane, Lemaire.  And I'm always curious about Prada having worked there for so long!

ALIX: What gives you cause for optimism?

LUCINDA: Pretty much everything… I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture.

ALIX: That’s a pretty good life.

"I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture." - Lucinda

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Lucinda Chambers

Brownstone Cowboys Magazine CONSCIOUS GIVING Main Image

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

LUCINDA: My family are all fine very luckily and we have been living at home, West London — me, my husband and one of our sons who goes back and forth to university.

ALIX: Tell me how you start a typical day. What’s the first thing you do when you get up in the morning?

LUCINDA: The first thing I do is wake up and turn the radio on to the news; my husband has brought me a cup of tea in bed for the last thirty years, lemon and ginger. I know, it’s treaty.

ALIX: You are a long time veteran of the fashion world. Were there times in the past that you considered starting your own collection (as we used to call it before ‘brand’ became such a big thing)?

LUCINDA: No, I had never considered starting my own business. I was often asked if I would, but the time was never right. I was too busy doing other things, which I loved.

ALIX: Why Colville now? What was the impetus? (And out of curiosity, where did the name come from?)

LUCINDA: I think I joined up with Molly and Colville because I had space in my life to do it, timing felt right and I wouldn’t have done it with anyone else.  We had worked together for years, so we know exactly how the other works, our strengths and weaknesses and also, very importantly, how to have a laugh. Molly and Kris [Kristen Forss, a third founder, now Colville collaborator] thought of the name. Colville is where we hang out, it’s where Hockney used to live. We love that part of London and I go there every Friday to the market...it felt right and it looked great when we designed it.

ALIX: What are you trying to do differently with Colville?

LUCINDA: I think we are running a very different company than what we have seen before. For a start, we champion everyone who we work with — everyone. We name names, give them a shout and spread the word. In that respect it feels more like a community, a collective, of like-minded people bought together. We have a great sense of people’s worth. This includes all the social projects that Colville does, from Turkey to Dhakar, Mexico and Suffolk! We sit down for lunch, usually delicious pasta, talk and then have coffee. Nothing is rushed, we take pleasure in everything we do.

ALIX: What is the spirit/soul/mission of Colville?

LUCINDA: The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last.

ALIX: What about it keeps you and your team most inspired and excited most?

LUCINDA: I think we all love to collaborate! Even if it's suggested [to work] with someone who feels very random, it gets us excited. We always have great brainstorming sessions, lots of ideas fly around and it’s our happy place. It’s also about the people we collaborate with. We love them and they mean something to us at Colville. We don’t take anyone for granted and what they bring to us, whether it’s skill or ideas or craft, it’s very exciting. We went on a trip to Asia and I think we had a blast! It seems very far away now, to have pop ups, meet customers and buyers, we loved every minute of it, and as for the food…heaven!

ALIX: Where do values like sustainability and community come in? And how do they impact the way that you approach Colville from a purely aesthetic point of view? 

LUCINDA: Sustainability and upcycling have always been and will always be a huge part of who we are, what defines us.  We are always finding new ways of doing things, always asking the questions and always challenging old ways of doing things to put better ones in place. We are small but growing, and have a lot to learn along the way — which is great I think, to keep evolving.

ALIX: What have been some of the biggest highs in this Colville journey?

LUCINDA: I think the highs always involve people. During lockdown, Molly and I did an impulsive Calling All Knitters project to help a women’s charity in Milan. The response was incredible, so touching how many people started knitting.  We approached Sotheby’s to help with the auction and they were on board straight away with all their help and expertise. It’s times like that you think, wow, people are just the best. Lately we have heard a lot about the negative impact of fashion on the world. 

ALIX: Do you think that fashion can still be a positive force for change? And if so, how?

LUCINDA: Fashion can always be positive. You find the people, the good ones, and with the creativity and positivity there you can put in place incredible things. Like any industry, there will be the not-so-like minded. I can sense them. And luckily I can avoid them. But if the goodwill is there, there is so much to love about fashion.  It can lift the spirits, change the way you feel about yourself, keep billions of people in employment and be very spiritually uplifting and extremely joyous.

ALIX: As a former magazine person, I’m curious to know what current magazines inspire you. Who do you think is doing a good job these days? Or, what do you think fashion/style magazines could be doing better?

LUCINDA: I really like looking at the nicer end of magazines, ones like The Pleasure Gardens, More of Less, Rika. I always marvel at the ingenuity of them, the sheer hard work and love that is cured into them, those are the ones I keep, they are usually the most creative and pure and visually very exciting. I am also a huge fan of The World of Interiors and AD.

ALIX: And on a similar note, are there other fashion brands out there you admire?

LUCINDA: There are lots of fashion brands that I like to dip into... I love Faye Toogood, Studio Nicholson, Christopher Kane, Lemaire.  And I'm always curious about Prada having worked there for so long!

ALIX: What gives you cause for optimism?

LUCINDA: Pretty much everything… I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture.

ALIX: That’s a pretty good life.

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Lucinda Chambers

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Lucinda Chambers

FASHION & BEAUTY

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

LUCINDA: My family are all fine very luckily and we have been living at home, West London — me, my husband and one of our sons who goes back and forth to university.

ALIX: Tell me how you start a typical day. What’s the first thing you do when you get up in the morning?

LUCINDA: The first thing I do is wake up and turn the radio on to the news; my husband has brought me a cup of tea in bed for the last thirty years, lemon and ginger. I know, it’s treaty.

ALIX: You are a long time veteran of the fashion world. Were there times in the past that you considered starting your own collection (as we used to call it before ‘brand’ became such a big thing)?

LUCINDA: No, I had never considered starting my own business. I was often asked if I would, but the time was never right. I was too busy doing other things, which I loved.

ALIX: Why Colville now? What was the impetus? (And out of curiosity, where did the name come from?)

LUCINDA: I think I joined up with Molly and Colville because I had space in my life to do it, timing felt right and I wouldn’t have done it with anyone else.  We had worked together for years, so we know exactly how the other works, our strengths and weaknesses and also, very importantly, how to have a laugh. Molly and Kris [Kristen Forss, a third founder, now Colville collaborator] thought of the name. Colville is where we hang out, it’s where Hockney used to live. We love that part of London and I go there every Friday to the market...it felt right and it looked great when we designed it.

ALIX: What are you trying to do differently with Colville?

LUCINDA: I think we are running a very different company than what we have seen before. For a start, we champion everyone who we work with — everyone. We name names, give them a shout and spread the word. In that respect it feels more like a community, a collective, of like-minded people bought together. We have a great sense of people’s worth. This includes all the social projects that Colville does, from Turkey to Dhakar, Mexico and Suffolk! We sit down for lunch, usually delicious pasta, talk and then have coffee. Nothing is rushed, we take pleasure in everything we do.

ALIX: What is the spirit/soul/mission of Colville?

LUCINDA: The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last.

ALIX: What about it keeps you and your team most inspired and excited most?

LUCINDA: I think we all love to collaborate! Even if it's suggested [to work] with someone who feels very random, it gets us excited. We always have great brainstorming sessions, lots of ideas fly around and it’s our happy place. It’s also about the people we collaborate with. We love them and they mean something to us at Colville. We don’t take anyone for granted and what they bring to us, whether it’s skill or ideas or craft, it’s very exciting. We went on a trip to Asia and I think we had a blast! It seems very far away now, to have pop ups, meet customers and buyers, we loved every minute of it, and as for the food…heaven!

ALIX: Where do values like sustainability and community come in? And how do they impact the way that you approach Colville from a purely aesthetic point of view? 

LUCINDA: Sustainability and upcycling have always been and will always be a huge part of who we are, what defines us.  We are always finding new ways of doing things, always asking the questions and always challenging old ways of doing things to put better ones in place. We are small but growing, and have a lot to learn along the way — which is great I think, to keep evolving.

ALIX: What have been some of the biggest highs in this Colville journey?

LUCINDA: I think the highs always involve people. During lockdown, Molly and I did an impulsive Calling All Knitters project to help a women’s charity in Milan. The response was incredible, so touching how many people started knitting.  We approached Sotheby’s to help with the auction and they were on board straight away with all their help and expertise. It’s times like that you think, wow, people are just the best. Lately we have heard a lot about the negative impact of fashion on the world. 

"The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last." - Lucinda

ALIX: Do you think that fashion can still be a positive force for change? And if so, how?

LUCINDA: Fashion can always be positive. You find the people, the good ones, and with the creativity and positivity there you can put in place incredible things. Like any industry, there will be the not-so-like minded. I can sense them. And luckily I can avoid them. But if the goodwill is there, there is so much to love about fashion.  It can lift the spirits, change the way you feel about yourself, keep billions of people in employment and be very spiritually uplifting and extremely joyous.

ALIX: As a former magazine person, I’m curious to know what current magazines inspire you. Who do you think is doing a good job these days? Or, what do you think fashion/style magazines could be doing better?

LUCINDA: I really like looking at the nicer end of magazines, ones like The Pleasure Gardens, More of Less, Rika. I always marvel at the ingenuity of them, the sheer hard work and love that is cured into them, those are the ones I keep, they are usually the most creative and pure and visually very exciting. I am also a huge fan of The World of Interiors and AD.

ALIX: And on a similar note, are there other fashion brands out there you admire?

LUCINDA: There are lots of fashion brands that I like to dip into... I love Faye Toogood, Studio Nicholson, Christopher Kane, Lemaire.  And I'm always curious about Prada having worked there for so long!

ALIX: What gives you cause for optimism?

LUCINDA: Pretty much everything… I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture.

ALIX: That’s a pretty good life.

"I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture." - Lucinda

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Lucinda Chambers

Interview: Alix Browne

Photographer: Samantha Colosari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Right about now we could all really use a shot (or two) in the arm. Literally, of course, but also figuratively. And for the latter, there is Colville. Beauty. Vibrancy. Comfort. Collaboration. Optimism. If Lucinda Chambers, who founded Colville in 2018 with her longtime friend and former Marni colleague Molly Molloy, insists that fashion can be spiritually uplifting and contribute some good to the world, well, it’s because the two of them are doing just that. Colville is thoughtful design, on a human scale, guided by passion and instinct. Suffice to say that Lucinda and Molly wear their joy on their sleeves — and that joy is highly contagious.

LUCINDA: My family are all fine very luckily and we have been living at home, West London — me, my husband and one of our sons who goes back and forth to university.

ALIX: Tell me how you start a typical day. What’s the first thing you do when you get up in the morning?

LUCINDA: The first thing I do is wake up and turn the radio on to the news; my husband has brought me a cup of tea in bed for the last thirty years, lemon and ginger. I know, it’s treaty.

ALIX: You are a long time veteran of the fashion world. Were there times in the past that you considered starting your own collection (as we used to call it before ‘brand’ became such a big thing)?

LUCINDA: No, I had never considered starting my own business. I was often asked if I would, but the time was never right. I was too busy doing other things, which I loved.

ALIX: Why Colville now? What was the impetus? (And out of curiosity, where did the name come from?)

LUCINDA: I think I joined up with Molly and Colville because I had space in my life to do it, timing felt right and I wouldn’t have done it with anyone else.  We had worked together for years, so we know exactly how the other works, our strengths and weaknesses and also, very importantly, how to have a laugh. Molly and Kris [Kristen Forss, a third founder, now Colville collaborator] thought of the name. Colville is where we hang out, it’s where Hockney used to live. We love that part of London and I go there every Friday to the market...it felt right and it looked great when we designed it.

ALIX: What are you trying to do differently with Colville?

LUCINDA: I think we are running a very different company than what we have seen before. For a start, we champion everyone who we work with — everyone. We name names, give them a shout and spread the word. In that respect it feels more like a community, a collective, of like-minded people bought together. We have a great sense of people’s worth. This includes all the social projects that Colville does, from Turkey to Dhakar, Mexico and Suffolk! We sit down for lunch, usually delicious pasta, talk and then have coffee. Nothing is rushed, we take pleasure in everything we do.

ALIX: What is the spirit/soul/mission of Colville?

LUCINDA: The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last.

ALIX: What about it keeps you and your team most inspired and excited most?

LUCINDA: I think we all love to collaborate! Even if it's suggested [to work] with someone who feels very random, it gets us excited. We always have great brainstorming sessions, lots of ideas fly around and it’s our happy place. It’s also about the people we collaborate with. We love them and they mean something to us at Colville. We don’t take anyone for granted and what they bring to us, whether it’s skill or ideas or craft, it’s very exciting. We went on a trip to Asia and I think we had a blast! It seems very far away now, to have pop ups, meet customers and buyers, we loved every minute of it, and as for the food…heaven!

ALIX: Where do values like sustainability and community come in? And how do they impact the way that you approach Colville from a purely aesthetic point of view? 

LUCINDA: Sustainability and upcycling have always been and will always be a huge part of who we are, what defines us.  We are always finding new ways of doing things, always asking the questions and always challenging old ways of doing things to put better ones in place. We are small but growing, and have a lot to learn along the way — which is great I think, to keep evolving.

ALIX: What have been some of the biggest highs in this Colville journey?

LUCINDA: I think the highs always involve people. During lockdown, Molly and I did an impulsive Calling All Knitters project to help a women’s charity in Milan. The response was incredible, so touching how many people started knitting.  We approached Sotheby’s to help with the auction and they were on board straight away with all their help and expertise. It’s times like that you think, wow, people are just the best. Lately we have heard a lot about the negative impact of fashion on the world. 

"The mission is to make beautiful clothes that tell a story and are made to last." - Lucinda

ALIX: Do you think that fashion can still be a positive force for change? And if so, how?

LUCINDA: Fashion can always be positive. You find the people, the good ones, and with the creativity and positivity there you can put in place incredible things. Like any industry, there will be the not-so-like minded. I can sense them. And luckily I can avoid them. But if the goodwill is there, there is so much to love about fashion.  It can lift the spirits, change the way you feel about yourself, keep billions of people in employment and be very spiritually uplifting and extremely joyous.

ALIX: As a former magazine person, I’m curious to know what current magazines inspire you. Who do you think is doing a good job these days? Or, what do you think fashion/style magazines could be doing better?

LUCINDA: I really like looking at the nicer end of magazines, ones like The Pleasure Gardens, More of Less, Rika. I always marvel at the ingenuity of them, the sheer hard work and love that is cured into them, those are the ones I keep, they are usually the most creative and pure and visually very exciting. I am also a huge fan of The World of Interiors and AD.

ALIX: And on a similar note, are there other fashion brands out there you admire?

LUCINDA: There are lots of fashion brands that I like to dip into... I love Faye Toogood, Studio Nicholson, Christopher Kane, Lemaire.  And I'm always curious about Prada having worked there for so long!

ALIX: What gives you cause for optimism?

LUCINDA: Pretty much everything… I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture.

ALIX: That’s a pretty good life.

"I am an optimist. I always think we can have another go at things, getting it better, having another chance. I think I’m a pretty happy person and see the good in people. Most of all I like having a laugh, whilst making a beautiful picture." - Lucinda

Photographer: Samantha Casolari

Stylist: Heathermary Jackson

Photographer Assistant: Christopher Connoll

Stylist Assistant: Ana Tess

Hair: Tetsuya Yamakta

Make up: Asami Matsuda

Talent: Laila Gohar, Jenna Gribbon, Jenny Schlenzka, Waris Ahluwalia

Studio: Beach House Studio

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
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